Storm water Drainage Ideas  RBC Roofing 817-360-2505

If your in the DFW area Including Weatherford, Granbury, Glen Rose and Stephenvile areas, RBC Roofing and Gutter Helmet would like for you to consider us for not only for Roofing, Gutters, Gutter helmet but for storm water drainage and control as well. Here are some thoughts on the best way to control Storm water drainage!

 

thisoldhouse.comYou can turn drainage solutions into features that enhance your landscape—and protect natural waterways. Ditches can be landscaped as swales that look like creek beds or small meadows. Gutter water can flow into rain gardens that provide a habitat for butterflies and birds. And driveways, patios, and walkways can be constructed of pervious paving that never puddles because water seeps through. Since these measures allow storm water to sink into the soil gradually, they help reduce flooding. Plus, they allow pollution, including oily residue from cars, to filter out naturally, so it doesn’t wind up in lakes or streams. “You can cure your wet-basement problem and do something for the environment at the same time,” says This Old House landscape contractor Roger Cook.

A buried perforated pipe underneath it sends excess water to a dry well.

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Swales are depressions that follow the contour around the base of a slope (natural or created), channeling storm water from one place to another. They filter runoff along the way by allowing it to sink into the soil. Plants on a swale’s gently sloping banks—and sometimes down the center of the ­channel itself—take up much of this water. Fast-draining soil is also key. The ­addition of a ­perforated pipe laid in gravel underneath can help ­handle heavy water flow.
Shown: This drainage swale designed by Jan Johnsen resembles a dry streambed.

A small swale might carry gutter water from a house to a dry well, while a more substantial one could run along the base of a hill above a low-­lying house to divert water around it. Jan Johnsen, a landscape designer in Mount Kisco, New York, ­often landscapes swales by lining them with river rock. Along the sides, she uses evergreen ferns, sedges, winterberry, grasses, and Siberian and Louisiana irises that thrive in thisoldhouse.commoist conditions. Rugged prairie plants or other natives that are at home in fast-draining soil are another option.

Designing a rain garden to handle all of the runoff from a roof or driveway entails careful calculations. But you can also learn by experimenting: Build one, watch what happens after a storm, and then enlarge it as needed.

Locate a rain garden at least 10 feet from your house and at least four times that far from a septic system or steep slope.
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Though you can excavate a small (say, 5-by-10-foot) rain garden yourself, a landscaper with an earth-moving machine will get it done faster. Make sure machinery stays along the edge of the bed so it doesn’t compact the soil as it digs a wide ­depression about 2 feet deep with gently sloping sides. Mix in compost and sand, as needed, using the same proportions as for a swale. The end result should be a shallow basin with about 6 inches of “ponding depth,” or space for water to pool while it drains through 1 to 2 feet of amended soil.

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